The Dreamshare Seer

Dreamshare Seer Resources

Dreamt by winter-art-5210 on 13 February 2024 “…a thick frayed rope from a huge ship, and a huge bust of Chairman Mao, they concocted a…”

A growing list of resources to further explore the themes that shaped The Dreamshare Seer ;  dreams, AI, community, art, Malaysian indigenous dreamwork, sleep, psychoanalysis, etc

Relevant books, articles, websites, films, music, artists, etc

We’re gradually adding information to this section!
If you have any recommendations, we’d love to hear them: Please contact us.

 

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Dreams: overview:

The Psychology of Dreaming – The Psychology of Everything, Josie Malinowski, Routledge (2020)

There are 2 peer-reviewed academic journals which focus on dreams:

Dreaming is a peer-reviewed academic journal published by the American Psychological Association on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Dreams.
https://www.apa.org/pubs/journals/drm

International Journal of Dream Research (Heidelberg University)
https://journals.ub.uni-heidelberg.de/index.php/IJoDR/index

 

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Sleep, Neuroscience of Dreaming:

Matthew Walker Why We Sleep, (2017), Penguin

24/7: Late Capitalism and the Ends of Sleep, Jonathan Crary. (2013), Verso

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Psychoanalysis and Dreams

Jung, C. G. (1934). The practical use of dream analysis. In C. G. Jung (Ed., R. F. C. Hull, Trans.), Dreams (pp. 87-108). London, UK: Routledge.

Jung, C. G. (1957). The Undiscovered Self (Present and Future). New York, NY: American Library.

Freud, S. (1900). “The interpretation of dreams,” in The Standard Edition of the Complete Works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. 4, 5, ed J. Strachey (London: Hogarth Press).

Freud, S. (1916). “Introductory lectures on psycho-analysis,” in The Standard Edition of the Complete Works of Sigmund Freud, Vol. 15, ed J. Strachey (London: Hogarth Press).

Greenberg, R., and Pearlman, C. A. (1999). The interpretation of dreams: a classic revisited. Psychoanal. Dialogues 9, 749–765. doi: 10.1080/10481889909539359

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Art and Psychoanalysis:

Maria Walsh  Art and Psychoanalysis, (2021), Bloomsbury Visual Arts

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Art and Dreams

Relevant art movements; Surrealism and Symbolism and dreams.

Andre Breton, Manifestoes of Surrealism,. (1972) Ann Arbor Paperbacks, University of Michigan Press

Surrealism and the Dream ( 2014), Dawn Ades (Author), José Jiménez (Editor), Georges Sebbag (Contributor), Fundacion Coleccion Thyssen-Bornemisza

Painting the Dream. A History of Dreams in Art, from the Renaissance to Surrealism, (2020),
Daniel Bergez, Abbeville Press.

Oneirology and art.

Mark Blagrove, Julia Lockheart,  The Science and Art of Dreaming( 2023) , Routledge

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AI, Dream databases + dreams and machine learning;

Database Of Dreams, The Lost Quest to Catalog Humanity – Rebecca Lemov  (2014)
Yale University Press
‘An acclaimed science historian uncovers the fascinating story of a “lost” project to unlock humanity’s common denominator that prefigured the emergence of Big Data’

Kelly Bulkeley’s Sleep and Dream Database https://sleepanddreamdatabase.org/

Schneider and Domhoff’s Dreambank, https://www.dreambank.net/

The overfitted brain hypothesis, Luke Y. Prince and Blake A. Richards, (2021) Patterns (N Y). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8134936/
Hoel’s theory is that dreaming is an exaptation, a trait that evolved for one purpose but later takes on others.
What is the purpose of dreaming? Many scientists have postulated a role for dreaming in learning, often with the aim of improving generative models. In this issue of Patterns, Erik Hoel proposes a novel hypothesis, namely, that dreaming provides a means to reduce overfitting. This hypothesis is interesting both for neuroscience and for the development of new machine-learning systems.The Neurocognitive Theory of Dreaming: The Where, How, When, What, and Why of Dreams  by G William Domhoff | 4 Oct 2022

 

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.192080

https://archivedream.wordpress.com/about/

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AI, digital tech and psychology:

Mind Change: How digital technologies are leaving their mark on our brains ( 2015) Susan Greenfield, Rider.

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Digital tech and art and ecology:

Ways of Being, James Bridle,  (2022) Penguin Books

New Dark Age: Technology and the End of the Future, James Bridle, (2018), Verso

 

A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.

Revonsuo, A. (2000). The reinterpretation of dreams: an evolutionary hypothesis of the function of dreaming.  Brain Sci.23, 793–1121. doi: 10.1017/S0140525X00004015

Foundations of Consciousness, Antti Revonsuo, (2017), Routledge

Annti Revonsuo, “Consciousness, Dreams, and Virtual Realities,” Philosophical Psychology 8 (1995): 14.

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History of dreaming

Dreaming in the World’s Religions: A Comparative History. Kelly Bulkeley. New York: New York University Press, 2008

Carnivals and Dreams: Pieter Bruegel and the History of the Imagination – Louise S. Milne, Published by Mutus Liber Books, 2011

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Anthropology of Dreaming (+ history + role dreaming within religions)

New Directions in the Anthropology of Dreaming Edited By Jeannette MageoRobin E. Sheriff

Bourguignon, Erika E. 1972. Dreams and altered states of consciousness in anthropological research. In Psychological anthropology. 2d ed. Edited by Francis L. K. Hsu, 403–434. Homewood, IL: Dorsey.

Bulkeley, Kelly, ed. 2001Dreams: A reader on religious, cultural and psychological dimensions of dreaming. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Iain R. Edgar, Guide to Imagework: Imagination-Based Research Methods (European Association of Social Anthropologists)  2004,  Routledge

Galinier, Jacques, Aurore Monod Becquelin, Guy Bordin, et al. 2010. Anthropology of the night: Cross-disciplinary investigations. Current Anthropology51:819–847.    The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research

Lohmann, Roger Ivar, ed. 2003. Dream travellers: Sleep experiences and culture in the western Pacific. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

Tedlock, Barbara, ed. 1987. Dreaming: Anthropological and psychological interpretations. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press.

Von Grunebaum, G. E., and Roger Caillois, eds. 1966. The dream and human societies. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press.

https://www.nature.com/articles/136969a0

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Malaysian Orang Asli Dreaming:

The Mystique of Dreams; A Search for Utopia Through Senoi Dream Theory by  William Domhoff  (1990), University of California Press

Theatre, Ritual and Transformation: Senoi Temiar, Sue Jennings, Routledge, (1995)Annti Revonsuo
Finnish cognitive neuroscientist, psychologist, and philosopher of mind.

Valli, K., and Revonsuo, A. (2009). The threat simulation theory in light of recent empirical evidence: a review.  J. Psychol.122, 17–38.

Revonsuo, A., Tuominen, J., & Valli, K. (2015). The avatars in the machine: Dreaming as a simulation of social reality. In T. Metzinger & J. M. Windt (Eds.), Open MIND: 32(T). Frankfurt am Main: MIND Group.

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Philosophy of Dreaming:

The philosophy of dreaming, Ben Springett: https://iep.utm.edu/dreaming-philosophy/#:~:text=Descartes’%20dream%20argument%20began%20with,are%20actually%20asleep%20and%20dreaming.
and https://www.thehumanfront.com/ten-questions-with-ben-springett/

https://www.academia.edu/40548985/Can_We_Know_About_the_Evolution_of_Dreaming

Contextual Philosophy:

Technic and Magic, The Reconstruction of Reality, Federico Campagna (Author), Timothy Morton (Preface), Bloomsbury Publishing, 31 May 2018

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A selection of Contemporary Artists working with Dreams and AI.

Iyo Bisseck : Dreaming beyond AI. 

aurèce vettier/Paul Mouginot;

A selection of Contemporary Artists  working with the subject of Dreams

A+E COLLECTIVE : The Dream Turbine.  See also :DREAMPAK.pdf

Creative Time is pleased to present Cosmologyscape (cosmologyscape.com), a multi-layered socially engaged public art project by Kite, an Oglála Lakȟóta artist and composer known for her groundbreaking practice combining performance and machine learning, and Alisha B Wormsley, an artist and cultural producer known for leveraging art production toward the redistribution of resources and reimagination of Black futures.  Cosmologyscape addresses the duality of dreams—as both individual tools of self-awareness and collective acts of imagination and world-building—and encourages the exploration of dreaming practices.
(13.6.’24)

Exit Night, Enter Light is a digital zine created collaboratively by the first-year master students in Contextual Design at Design Academy Eindhoven. Over a period of three months, they conceptualised, designed and produced this document under the theme of nightmares/daydreams— the dream in all forms.
(13.6.’24)

 

A selection of Contemporary Artists using AI (critically!)

Hito Steyerl
https://news.artnet.com/art-world/these-renderings-do-not-relate-to-reality-hito-steyerl-on-the-ideologies-embedded-in-a-i-image-generators-22646

Trevor Paglen
https://sites.barbican.org.uk/trevorpaglen/
https://excavating.ai/

Pierre Huyghe:

Femke Herregraven investigates material realities, geographies, and value systems carved out by global finance and geopolitics. Spanning high-frequency trading, mineral mining, cat bonds, and algorithmic systems, her work makes tangible the effects of the financial and technological abstractions on ecosystems, historiography, and individual lives.

Isaac Clarke, 

Gilchrist, Bruce (2022) Poetics of Artificial Intelligence in Art Practice: (Mis)apprehended Bodies Remixed as Language. Doctoral thesis https://sure.sunderland.ac.uk/id/eprint/14711/1/14711.pdf

Memo Atken: (2021) Deep Visual Instruments: Realtime Continuous, Meaningful Human Control over Deep Neural Networks for Creative Expression.  Doctoral thesis

https://research.gold.ac.uk/id/eprint/30191/

Maggie Roberts and Ranu Mukherjee, and their collective practice 0rphan Drift (0D)

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Film:

the abundant incorporation of dream structure and the subject of dreaming in contemporary cinema; from Lucretia Martel (Argentina) to Apichatpong Weeresethakul (Thailand), Naomi Kawase (Japan) etc to David Lynch,

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Fiction:

Literature; Ursula Le Guinn, the word for world is forest.., and The Lathe of Heaven (1971)

 

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historical; medieval study of dreams

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Also; indigenous; other dream cultures.  Anthropology

Primordial theories of dreams as background to the Malaysian

https://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/display/document/obo-9780199766567/obo-9780199766567-0120.xml

 

Bourguignon, Erika E. 1972. Dreams and altered states of consciousness in anthropological research. In Psychological anthropology. 2d ed. Edited by Francis L. K. Hsu, 403–434. Homewood, IL: Dorsey.

Argues that dreams form part of a continuum with trance-induced visions and spirit possession, with not all languages distinguishing semantically between these phenomena. Many cultures see all three as offering genuine access to supernatural agents, differing only in the social context of their production.

 

Bulkeley, Kelly, ed. 2001. Dreams: A reader on religious, cultural and psychological dimensions of dreaming. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

A collection of classic articles on dreaming, drawn from religious studies and psychology as well as anthropology. Includes anthropological works by Kracke 1981 (cited under Psychological and Psychoanalytic Anthropology) and Lohmann 2000 (cited under Dreams and Cultural Change/Continuity). There are also articles on the significance of dreams in Buddhism, Islam, and ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian religion.

 

Iain R. Edgar Guide to Imagework: Imagination-Based Research Methods (European Association of Social Anthropologists)  2004, Routledge
A Guide to Imagework is a pioneering guide to a new trend in ethnographic research: the use of imaginative, experiential methods such as dreamwork, artwork, Gestalt theory and psychodrama. Originating in group counselling and psychiatric therapy, imagework techniques explore subjects’ imaginative resources to reveal unconscious knowledge about identity, belief and society. They are ideal for accessing rich qualitative data about how individuals and cultures function. Iain Edgar, a leading specialist on ethnographic method, has condensed top-level research theory on imagework into this handy practical manual. Complete with case studies and examples, hands-on tips and guidance on methods and ethics, it is an ideal starting point for any imagework project.

Galinier, Jacques, Aurore Monod Becquelin, Guy Bordin, et al. 2010. Anthropology of the night: Cross-disciplinary investigations. Current Anthropology51:819–847.    The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research
DOI: 
1086/653691  Eight French and two Italian anthropologists come together to propose that anthropology has badly neglected half of all human experience: the nighttime half. Includes seven commentaries (by Chenhall, Daveluy, Ekirch, Glaskin, Heijnen, Steger, and Wright) and a response by the original authors. Translated from French by Richard Crabtree

Lohmann, Roger Ivar, ed. 2003. Dream travellers: Sleep experiences and culture in the western Pacific. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

DOI: 10.1057/9781403982476

A theoretically diverse collection of articles about dreaming in societies from New Guinea and aboriginal Australia (and one from Sulawesi). Authors not appearing elsewhere in this bibliography include Joel Robbins; Pamela Stewart and Andrew Strathern; Wolfgang Kempf and Elfriede Herrmann; Robert Tonkinson; Ian Keen; and Jane Goodale.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dream-Travelers-Experiences-Culture-Western/dp/1403963304/ref=sr_1_6?crid=1W24OEJAHM4P5&keywords=%E2%80%A2+Lohmann%2C+Roger&qid=1696158764&rnid=1642204031&s=books&sprefix=lohmann+roger+%2Caps%2C50&sr=1-6

 

Tedlock, Barbara, ed. 1987. Dreaming: Anthropological and psychological interpretations. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Univ. Press.

A seminal collection of articles aimed at reinvigorating the anthropology of dreaming (which Tedlock deems to have fallen into neglect following the collapse of the Culture and Personality school) by exposing it to various psychological theories of dreaming. Authors include Gilbert Herdt, Bruce Mannheim, William Merrill, and John Homiak.

 

Von Grunebaum, G. E., and Roger Caillois, eds. 1966. The dream and human societies. Berkeley: Univ. of California Press.

A highly eclectic collection of essays, including theoretical perspectives from neurophysiology, Jungian psychology, phenomenology, literary theory, and sociology; ethnographic reports from the Hopi, Ojibwa, and modern Mexico; and historical studies of dreams in ancient Greek, Mesopotamian, and Islamic literature. Anthropological contributors include George Devereux and Dorothy Eggan.

 

Dreaming in the World’s Religions: A Comparative History. Kelly Bulkeley. New York: New York University Press, 2008
From Biblical stories of Joseph interpreting Pharoh’s dreams in Egypt to prayers against bad dreams in the Hindu Rg Veda, cultures all over the world have seen their dreams first and foremost as religiously meaningful experiences. In this widely shared view, dreams are a powerful medium of transpersonal guidance offering the opportunity to communicate with sacred beings, gain valuable wisdom and power, heal suffering, and explore new realms of existence. Conversely, the world’s religious and spiritual traditions provide the best source of historical information about the broad patterns of human dream life
Dreaming in the World’s Religions provides an authoritative and engaging one-volume resource for the study of dreaming and religion. It tells the story of how dreaming has shaped the religious history of humankind, from the Upanishads of Hinduism to the Qur’an of Islam, from the conception dream of Buddhas mother to the sexually tempting nightmares of St. Augustine, from the Ojibwa vision quest to Australian Aboriginal journeys in the Dreamtime. Bringing his background in psychology to bear, Kelly Bulkeley incorporates an accessible consideration of cognitive neuroscience and evolutionary psychology into this fascinating overview.
Dreaming in the World’s Religions offers a carefully researched, accessibly written portrait of dreaming as a powerful, unpredictable, often iconoclastic force in human religious life.

https://www.jstor.org/stable/40059845?seq=1 Dreaming Ecology: Beyond the Between            Deborah Bird Rose.
From September 1980 to July 1982, Debbie conducted twenty-two months of ethnographic research among the Aboriginal communities of Yarralin and Lingarra in Australia’s Northern Territory. With her first major book, Dingo Makes us Human, she described a ‘Dreaming ecology’ that is ‘embedded in a system that has no centre’ (Citation1992, 220). In dialogue with her Yarralin teachers—especially Hobbles Danayarri—as well as thinkers like James Lovelock and Gregory Bateson, she described ecological systems composed of conscious beings who communicate, act and react, and ‘adhere as a matter of self-interest and free will to the same set of understandings’ (Citation1992, 220).

 

Cf; https://www.academia.edu/1566731/Dreams_and_Ethnography

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The Spiritual and Art:

The Other Side: A Journey into Women, Art and the Spirit World,   Jennifer Higgie,   Weidenfeld and Nicolson, (2023)
In an illuminating blend of memoir and art history, The Other Side explores the lives and work of a group of extraordinary women artists. From the twelfth-century mystic Hildegard of Bingen and the nineteenth-century spiritualist Georgiana Houghton to the pioneering Hilma af Klint, these women all – in their own unique ways – shared the same goal: to communicate with, and learn from, other dimensions.
Weaving in and out of their myriad lives, Jennifer Higgie considers the solace of ritual, the gender exclusions of art history, the contemporary relevance of myth, the boom in alternative ways of understanding the world and the impact of spiritualism on feminism and contemporary art.

 

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        A woman is sleeping; A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. . The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A hole is puncturing the celluloid 35mm film that this image is made from. The hole appears to be in, because it coincides with, the grass to the lower right hand side of the bench. The hole appears to be letting in bright light from the other side of this image. The image is by artist, Adam Chodzko and is part of his "sleeper.hole" series.
“Sleepers.Hole” (2012 – ), Adam Chodzko

        A wolf emerging from behind a wall. Night Shift (2004) Event, performance and a double-sided poster/map 42cm x 62cm given out free at the Frieze Art Fair in 2004.
‘Night Shift’ (2004), Adam Chodzko

        A skunk at night at the Frieze Art Fair, London, photograhhed using nighvision technology, l. Night Shift (2004) Event, performance and a double-sided poster/map 42cm x 62cm given out free at the Frieze Art Fair in 2004.
‘Night Shift’ (2004), Adam Chodzko

        A rat at night at the Frieze Art Fair, London, photograhhed using nighvision technology, l. Night Shift (2004) Event, performance and a double-sided poster/map 42cm x 62cm given out free at the Frieze Art Fair in 2004.
‘Night Shift’ (2004), Adam Chodzko

        A scorpion at night at the Frieze Art Fair, London, photograhhed using nighvision technology, l. Night Shift (2004) Event, performance and a double-sided poster/map 42cm x 62cm given out free at the Frieze Art Fair in 2004.
‘Night Shift’ (2004), Adam Chodzko

        A toad at night at the Frieze Art Fair, London, photograhhed using nighvision technology, l. Night Shift (2004) Event, performance and a double-sided poster/map 42cm x 62cm given out free at the Frieze Art Fair in 2004.
‘Night Shift’ (2004), Adam Chodzko

        A colourfully lit woodland at night. "Nightvision" (1998) Two-screen synchronised video projection 13 mins 20 seconds
Nightvision (1998) Adam Chodzko

        A group of lighting technicians filmed using a nightvision lens, in a woodland at night. "Nightvision" (1998) Two-screen synchronised video projection 13 mins 20 seconds
Nightvision (1998) Adam Chodzko

        A montage of plants and code as part of 'O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix' (2020) Adam Chodzko
‘O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix’ (2020) Adam Chodzko

        A montage of plants and code as part of 'O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix' (2020) Adam Chodzko
‘O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix’ (2020) Adam Chodzko

        A montage of plants and code as part of 'O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix' (2020) Adam Chodzko
‘O, you happy roots, branch and mediatrix’ (2020) Adam Chodzko